The Tube

The Tube – TVTelevision – A way of life (for many)

Andy and Barney

Andy and Barney

I was simply thinking about how our lives have been impacted by television since I was, oh, 5 years old.
Back then, I watched a lot of TV and more as I grew up.

Let me tell you that when I was around 10, I watched about 70-80 hours of television per week! Oh yes, I did.

Now, the thing is, we lived out in the country. I had a sister, but, for the most part, I was alone and the TV was my friend. It kept me company while I read, ate, did homework, played with modeling clay, and rested. It was on nearly all day when I was home. When at school, I would ride the bus home and turn the TV on from 3:40-8:30 (Bedtime).

Superman over the years

Superman over the years

As I grew up, my bedtime was extended by about 30 minute increments, and I added 1 show to my routine.
My favorites, you ask? Glad you did! or this post would be done! πŸ™‚
Monday thru Friday, I pretty much watched the same afternoon-early evening line up:
Superman
Dark Shadows
Gilligan’s Island
Twilight Zone
Dick Van Dyke
Andy Griffith (Loved the “Darlings”)
–At Night–
Lost in Space
Time Tunnel
Land of the Giants
Star Trek
Mr. Terrific
Batman
The Outer Limits
Petticoat Junction
–Weekends–
Saturday Morning Cartoons
I watched a lot of old movies of all types
My favorite, of course, were sci-fi and horror

There were others, lots of others, but the idea was that I had lots of friends in that little electric box.
I grew up with them; I knew them all; l even loved most of them. What was important to them was important to me. In fact, I derived a lot of my basic lifestyle (internal) from the TV and the books I read.

Lost in Space (Had Values)

Lost in Space (Had Values)

This wasn’t so bad, really. I learned manners, good vs bad, treat women well, what foods you should eat, and how to do about a million things (most of which would not work).
I see television as kind of the Facebook of yesterday. It was a social network of sorts. We communicated by having all these stars in common.
We could go around asking “What would Andy do?” and everyone knew who we were talking about. If we discussed news and mentioned that so-and-so was sick on Petticoat Junction, we were all in the know and could share and feel sorry for our friend.
At some point, however, we started having shows that focused more on violence and hatred and sex. I am not condemning shows that have those (that would be a judgement), I am just saying that the whole ordeal switched from Barney Fife trying to talk Andy into letting him put his one bullet, actually, in his gun; and went to how many people got eaten by zombies in “The Walking Dead” last season. I like TWD, but it is a little scary that, what should be reserved for adults, is known by 7 and 8 year olds with full knowledge of their parents.

The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead

It spreads it to our schools and students get into trouble for a spit ball thirty years ago and now it’s for carrying a gun into school (loaded) or doing drugs in the bathroom and selling them in the halls or at lunch. I wondered where this idea would take me when I started, so here we are.

In about 40-45 years we have gone from a society who felt that Dennis the Menace should be paddled and sat in the corner to a society where paddling Dennis would get you reported to CPS and why would you paddle him for what little he does compared to now?

I have heard it said (sometimes, by our children, sometimes, by the adults) that our world is maturing, growing up, learning to face the truth. I just want to know whose truth is it that means children have to have free access to everything that is going on all over the world all the time? Do we not have a right and an obligation to keep some of this “truth” away from them for a while so they can still be kids?

Maybe not, but, one thing’s for certain, when I was growing up, it might not have been the “good ol’ days”, but I sure had less to worry about than our kids do today.
Namaste,
Scott

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Comments

  • Aspergers Girls  On May 11, 2012 at 5:35 pm

    Loved Gilligan’s Island. Very thought out post. And very true. Kids are exposed to very complex and mature concepts at a very young age. Society has clearly changed. Enjoyed reading this. Love the Walking Dead…do not show to the kids. πŸ™‚ Happy Friday, Sam

    Like

  • southernhon  On May 11, 2012 at 6:45 am

    I nominated you for the Versatile Blogger award!
    http://southernhon.wordpress.com/2012/05/11/versatile-blogger/

    Like

  • magsx2  On May 11, 2012 at 4:30 am

    Hi,
    Yes I remember running home from school to watch some of these, I think Superman was on early in the afternoon, and then I would have to get my homework done before tea time. That was a long time ago now. πŸ˜€

    I used to watch all those you have written down except Batman, I was never a Batman fan. πŸ™‚

    Like

    • kindredspirit23  On May 11, 2012 at 10:49 am

      First, it is funny to remember that my father used to always say how strange it was that Superman could stop a train and many bullets, but, when the guys threw the “gun” at him, he would duck!

      Second, I liked Batman, but one of the biggest reasons to watch it was Yvonne Craig (Batgirl); I was young, but I still was male! Oh, and speaking of her, she was the “green” dancer on the early Star Trek if anyone remembers that one!
      Scott

      Like

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